107 posts tagged with Mississippi.
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Abortion clinic procedure room as sacred space

In a Radio Boston interview with host Meghna Chakrabarti, Dr. Willie Parker explains how his Christianity called him to help women who need abortions. "Even if I conceded that a fetus is a person on par with the woman carrying it, the problem still remains: How do you give rights to a fetus, to a person that's inside of a person, without taking rights from the person that the person is inside of?" [more inside]
posted by cybercoitus interruptus on Dec 11, 2017 - 74 comments

Queer in the Deep South

The rest of the country sees queer life in the Deep South as being really tragic and utterly challenging and ultimately ending in suicide, so, what I wanted was to sort of elevate these stories and sort of celebrate them in the way that I saw them flourishing.”
'New Deep South' Series Explores LGBTQ Life in Mississippi. [more inside]
posted by Grandysaur on Nov 27, 2017 - 6 comments

"And the food was always phenomenal"

The Untold Story Of America's Southern Chinese "There's a rather unknown community of Chinese-Americans who've lived in the Mississippi Delta for more than a hundred years. They played an important role in the segregated South in the middle of the 20th century. Join us as we get a taste of Southern Chinese food and learn about the unique history of the Delta Chinese." [more inside]
posted by TheGoodBlood on Oct 12, 2017 - 8 comments

Free The Land!

“This is the building of the new society,” he said, adding later: “For so long Mississippi has been known as the symbol of limits. It has been known as a haven for oppression, for some of the most horrible suffering in the history of the world. So it is only fitting that we should become the leaders of that change.” - In Jackson Mississippi, a new vision of society istaking root with its bold new mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba - The Socialist Experiment - Oxford American
posted by The Whelk on Sep 21, 2017 - 6 comments

McDonald's Store in Hot Coffee, MS

is a family business in the town of Hot Coffee, Mississippi. They sell shoes and brooms and ice cream and PVC fittings and hoop cheese and souse. They've been open since 1967. They just repainted.
posted by escabeche on Sep 15, 2017 - 25 comments

Gulf of Mexico's 60,000 year old underwater forest

In an ice age, a couple ice ages ago, a forest of cypress trees was lost under the waves of the Gulf of Mexico. Amazingly, the wood is still intact, and can tell scientists about ancient forests, and how rising sea levels might affect modern forests. This short documentary will introduce you to the hurricane that allowed for the discovery, the process of diving for samples and studying them, and what we can learn from this amazing find. [more inside]
posted by HakaiMagazine on Jun 26, 2017 - 10 comments

American Banksy

Artist Rides Rivers in a Homemade Shantyboat to Learn About the People Who Live on the Banks. Wes Modes, an artist and lecturing professor at UC Santa Cruz and a crew full of creative mates built a shanty boat out of found materials and trash and rode down both the Mississippi River and the Tennessee River over the course of the past two summers. The collective purpose of these journeys is to learn about the people who live on and around the banks and the about the ecology of the rivers. These collected stories are part of the larger multimedia project entitled “A Secret History of American River People“. (it's okay to read the comments on this link folks as it mostly pertains to Water Law.) [more inside]
posted by ActingTheGoat on Apr 29, 2017 - 13 comments

A Greek Tragedy

"We Thought the Sun Would Always Shine on Our Lives" Bright, beautiful, and beloved, the young women of Chi Omega had it all—until they didn't.
posted by COD on Mar 29, 2017 - 105 comments

Symbols matter

What I Pledge Allegiance To. "I am a black Mississippian. I am a black American. I pledge to never be passive, patriotic, or grateful in the face of American abuse. I pledge to always thoughtfully bite the self-righteous American hand that thinks it’s feeding us. I pledge to perpetually reckon with the possibility that there will never be any liberty, peace, and justice for all unless we accept that America, like Mississippi, is not clean. Nor is it great. Nor is it innocent." -- Author Kiese Laymon, Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi [more inside]
posted by zarq on Sep 21, 2016 - 19 comments

I am the Potter Who Was

George Ohr: The Mad Potter of Biloxi. Visit the in Biloxi, where his twisted, flowing, lumpy, misshapen, crimped, dented, folded, and shimmering ceramic pieces are on display. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 17, 2016 - 7 comments

Free State of Jones

The True Story of the 'Free State of Jones': A new Hollywood movie looks at the tale of the Mississippi farmer who led a revolt against the Confederacy (Smithsonian Mag). Newton Knight has always been a controversial figure. "This controversy was fueled in part by Knight's postwar marriage to a formerly enslaved black woman, which effectively established a small mixed-race community in southeastern Mississippi."(Jones County, Mississippi) [more inside]
posted by cwest on May 27, 2016 - 26 comments

Riding in Cars with Beers

Life in the last state where you can still drink and drive
posted by almostmanda on Apr 29, 2016 - 52 comments

Six candidates, eight days, eleven states: Election 2016 continues

It's another day of multi-state voting in the live version of House of Cards otherwise known as Election 2016. On the Republican side, four candidates remain: Rafael Edward Cruz, John Richard Kasich, Marco Antonio Rubio, and Donald John Trump. On the Democrat side, Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton and Bernard Sanders continue their fight. As the math becomes clearer, and with several months still to go before potentially feisty party conventions, the odds [Oddschecker] [PredictWise] remain on both Clinton and Trump as the favorites to win their respective nominations. More on today's voting from ABC, Fortune and USA Today, while on the horizon, in-person voting begins in Florida... [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Mar 5, 2016 - 2551 comments

Anywhere I go, I just haves a zeal.

Was it surprising that your music became popular again?

Well, no. Because everywhere I went, even when I was five and six years old, when I’d go to these clubs to play, the first thing they would say when I walked in the door, folks started to pattin’ and hollerin’, ''Let Sam have it! Let Sam have it!'' And I’d get that, man, and people - whoo! I’d put life all in there! And it’s the same thing right now. Anywhere I go, I just haves a zeal. I have a good zeal to play.
Sam Chatmon - Make Me A Pallet On the Floor [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Dec 24, 2015 - 11 comments

Chinese Americans in the time of Jim Crow

Shortly after the dust of the Civil War had settled, plantation owners in the Deep South tried to replace the labor of black ex-slaves with Chinese immigrants--most of whom left rather than put up with bad working conditions. Some, however, stayed in the Mississippi Delta through the end of Jim Crow, often carving out a role for themselves in the South's harsh racial climate as grocers serving primarily black communities. In fact, a historic Supreme Court case extending the reach of segregation to all non-white people took place when a Chinese family sued a local white school board. Now these grocers are dying out as their children leave the South, but groups like Southern Foodways are collecting their stories so that their contribution to Southern history can be remembered.
posted by sciatrix on Nov 11, 2015 - 14 comments

On the instant when we come to realize that tragedy is second-hand

A white pseudo-aristocracy maintains genteel airs and graces amid crumbling towns and black rural poverty reminiscent of Haiti. It’s all stirred up with whiskey, denial and fire-breathing religion.

The Delta is arguably the most racist, or racially obsessed, place in America, and yet you see more ease and conviviality between blacks and whites than in the rest of America.
After nearly three years here, it still feels like we’re scratching the surface.

posted by four panels on Nov 7, 2015 - 81 comments

“You leave when you get ready, and not with nobody telling you."

Mamie Lang was 7 years old when her father gathered her mother and her four siblings in the middle of the night to catch a train. The Langs left Ellisville, Mississippi, just ahead of a lynch mob. Mamie Lang Kirkland returned to the town of her birth this year, a century later. SLNYT
posted by Etrigan on Sep 20, 2015 - 9 comments

“His death certificate should say: Hurricane Katrina.”

"Billy McDonald rose to political power in a little Mississippi beach town on the strength of his resilience and colorful personality. But when Hurricane Katrina hit Pass Christian, it took everything from him and his city."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 23, 2015 - 2 comments

"Your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride."

If cuisine drives (or helps) you decide your travel plans, USA Today's list of food favorites covers Best Farmers Market, Best Food Trail, Best Food Factory Tour, Best Al Fresco Dining Neighborhood and Best Local Food Scene. All those lists are pretty self-explanatory, except for the food trails, which aren't even fully described in the more verbose slideshow of the top 10. And of course there are more than 10 food trails in the US (not to mention abroad), so let's dive in. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 23, 2015 - 13 comments

"If someone doesn’t want to have sex with you, don’t have sex with them"

In the United States, only 22 states require that sex education should be taught in their schools. Of those, only 13 insist upon medical accuracy. There is no federal standard. As a result, classroom lessons that teach purity culture – the idea that virginity is a state of moral accomplishment – are pervasive. John Oliver's Last Week Tonight covers Sex Education in America. (NSFW) The end of the segment features a modern sex education video created by LWT, narrated by several celebrities (including Laverne Cox, Nick Offerman, Jonathan Banks, Kristen Schaal and Aisha Tyler) that touches on topics outdated lessons may be ignoring. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 15, 2015 - 45 comments

Truck Driver Wins Mississippi Governor Primary Without Really Trying

Mississippi Governor Dewey Phillip "Phil" Bryant is pretty confident that he will be re-elected this year. His only opponent in the Republican primary spent less than $1000 on the campaign, and every prominent Democrat -- in fact, every Democrat who had ever run for office in the state -- declined to run. And that's how truck driver (and retired firefighter) Robert Gray won the Democratic gubernatorial primary without party backing, money, a website, or even a Facebook page. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Aug 5, 2015 - 53 comments

Writing the memoir (or "memory war")

Harrison Scott Key, author of "The World's Largest Man" on the writing of memoirs
posted by ColdChef on Jul 2, 2015 - 1 comment

"If one of you gets eaten, we will name the boat after you," I said.

In the summer of 1987, my father tried to murder me with an alligator.
posted by zarq on May 13, 2015 - 18 comments

"Maybe they'll think of me differently. I hope they don't."

In some parts of America, the accessibility of abortion has remained unchanged, but not in great swaths of the country — not in places such as Texas, where more than half of the clinics have closed since 2013, or in South Dakota, where the single clinic has a mandatory 72-hour waiting period between appointment and procedure, or in Wyoming, where there is one private provider and no clinics in all the state's 98,000 square miles, and where the nearest facility Emily could find an appointment was six hours away.
One woman's long drive to end a pregnancy. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on May 11, 2015 - 49 comments

So long, Wolfman, so long

Today we bid a sad farewell to the last of the old-school Mississippi Hill Country bluesmen: Mr. Robert Belfour was a purveyor or that gritty, driving, riff-based, often one-chord Hill Country style pioneered by people like Mississippi Fred McDowell, and in more recent years popularized by artists like RL Burnside, Junior Kimbrough and Jessie Mae Hemphill. Let's take a listen, then, as we pay our respects to the "Wolfman", to some of his rocking, soulful blues. Here's Black Mattie, I Got My Eyes On You, Hill Stomp, Go Ahead On, My Baby's Gone, Done Got Old and You Got Me Crying. And here's an hour-long recording from February 2013, via NPR: Robert Belfour: Live In Concert.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 25, 2015 - 13 comments

A Scar On The Map

Judge Carlton Reeves sentenced three young white men in the murder of an innocent black man. But first, he had something to tell them. [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Feb 14, 2015 - 80 comments

The Color Line Murders

The Equal Justice Initiative has released a report (pdf) on the history of lynchings in the United States, the result of five years of research. The authors compiled an inventory of 3,959 victims of “racial terror lynchings” in 12 Southern states from 1877 to 1950 -- documenting more than 700 additional victims, which places the number of murders more than 20 percent higher than previously reported. "The process is intended... to force people to reckon with the narrative through-line of the country’s vicious racial history, rather than thinking of that history in a short-range, piecemeal way." Map. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 11, 2015 - 58 comments

goin' jukin' tonight

LAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI JUKES is Robert Mugge's 86-minute film from 2002, focussing on the juke joint tradition in Mississippi, with special emphasis on Jackson's Subway Lounge and Clarksdale's Ground Zero Blues Club.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 17, 2015 - 5 comments

“Wasn’t anything we could do about it.”

How White Flight Destroyed the Mississippi Delta (SL longform Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 6, 2015 - 49 comments

this will answer all of your questions but it is in Chinese

The Shack Up Inn is a hospitality institution just outside of historic Clarksdale, Mississippi. Their FAQ page helpfully provides information regarding any questions you might have about amenities, bedding quality, or Didelphimorphia reproduction.
posted by theodolite on Nov 24, 2014 - 15 comments

Tamale Recipes, Sweet and Savory

Delta Hot Tamales Are Hotter Than Ever
Delta "hots" themselves perfectly exemplify the tamale's malleable properties. Made with cornmeal instead of the lime-treated masa used in Mexico, a Delta hot is simmered (rather than steamed) in a spiced broth—hence the name. Though the dish's precise origin remains elusive, it's said that at one point in the 1920s a few Mexican cotton pickers made their way up from the Rio Grande Valley, toting a recipe that was then transformed by local African-American cooks—possibly aided by southern Italians who'd settled in the area. Whatever. By 1936, tamales were so entrenched in Delta culture that Robert Johnson, who'd made his pact with the devil just up the road from Greenville, recorded a song about them called "They're Red Hot."
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 12, 2014 - 46 comments

The Abortion Ministry of Dr. Willie Parker


posted by
cybercoitus interruptus on Aug 1, 2014 - 48 comments

"Crack Mississippi, and you crack the whole South."

In 1964, less than 7% of Mississippi’s African Americans were registered to vote, compared to between 50 and 70% in other southern states. In many rural counties, African Americans made up the majority of the population and the segregationist white establishment was prepared to use any means necessary to keep them away from the polls and out of elected office. As Mississippian William Winter recalls, “A lot of white people thought that African Americans in the South would literally take over and white people would have to move, would have to get out of the state.”
This summer fifty years ago well over a thousand volunteers went to Mississippi to help register as many African-Americans as possible to vote, in the Freedom Summer, which would end with at least seven people murdered for their support for the campaign. For PBS's American Experience series, director Stanley Nelson has created a movie about the campaign, which you can watch online. A transcript, introduction and other resources are also available.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 23, 2014 - 10 comments

Mississippi Smouldering

Fifty years ago this week Andrew Goodman, James Cheney, and Michael Schwerner, three voting rights workers were savagely beaten and shot to death by klansmen after being stopped by a Neshoba County, Mississippi Sheriff's Deputies. Today, sheriff's deputies across Mississippi have been tasked with preventing voter intimidation in the ugly Republican primary runoff election between incumbern Thad Cochran and Tea Party favorite Chris McDaniel. [more inside]
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot on Jun 24, 2014 - 57 comments

Those Three Are On My Mind

James Chaney. Andrew Goodman. Michael Schwerner. Murdered by the KKK 50 years ago today, in one of the galvanizing events of the struggle for civil rights in the South. (previously 1, 2, 3) [more inside]
posted by scody on Jun 21, 2014 - 32 comments

Cotton, Machines, People, Boxes, and You

Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt
posted by psoas on Dec 1, 2013 - 39 comments

What can brown (water) do for you?

Greenville, Mississippi lies in the heart of the Delta and claims a number of writers from its neck of the woods, including Walker Percy and Shelby Foote. What is it about Greenville that would produce such talent? Is there something in the water? Some people think so.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 15, 2013 - 9 comments

On the Red River

A new critically acclaimed film (96%) is coming out soon 12 Years a Slave (trailer), the true story of Solomon Northup. His memoir is a riveting read (or listen to Louis Gossett, Jr. reading it), but this post is about where Northup was enslaved, a cotton plantation near the Red River, Louisiana. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Sep 15, 2013 - 5 comments

Brokeback Mississipi

In 2007 paracanoeist (V1 - A) Dan Hopwood, Stu MacKinnon, Dan Burton and Steve O'Reilly canoed 2350 miles down the Mississippi raising 15K for charity. They competed the trip in 59 days with no support crew.
posted by Deathalicious on Sep 5, 2013 - 3 comments

"When I saw his body and what it was like, I knew I couldn't say no."

Willie Reed, key witness in the Emmett Till case, has died in Chicago at age 76. Reed was an 18-year-old sharecropper who witnessed Emmett Till's murder in August 1955. Despite being threatened at gunpoint by J.W. Milam, one of Till's killers, Reed came forward to serve as a surprise witness for the prosecution at trial [PDF of Reed's testimony]. [more inside]
posted by liketitanic on Jul 20, 2013 - 66 comments

Take the Impossible “Literacy” Test

Slate posts on a 1960's era voting literacy tests [more inside]
posted by garlic on Jun 28, 2013 - 267 comments

America's 10 Worst Prisons

"'If you can't do the time, don't do the crime.' So goes the old saying. Yet conditions in some American facilities are so obscene that they amount to a form of extrajudicial punishment." Mother Jones is profiling "America's 10 Worst Prisons." Facilities were chosen for the list based on "...three years of research, correspondence with prisoners, and interviews with reform advocates." [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 14, 2013 - 88 comments

One more integrated prom

Wilcox County High School is a small, rural school, located three hours south of Atlanta. Recently, in a school district that serves some 1,300 students in total. The high school has been in the news for it's continued tradition of holding segregated proms, and for the efforts of some of the local students to raise funds to hold the first officially integrated prom in the community's history. Though, most students were welcome to the "black prom," the first officially integrated prom happened this past Saturday. So many donors came forward, from around the world, that the students say they have money left over to help local families in need. Unfortunately, this doesn't mean an end to the community's history of segregated proms, as the "white prom" was still held, but a week earlier in Fitzgerald, Georgia, less than 10 miles south of the Wilcox County border. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 29, 2013 - 29 comments

“Can’t You See I’m In Pain?”

Major Label vs. Indie, as told by Iggy Pop. Blatant plug for new album, but funny as hell.
posted by timsteil on Apr 29, 2013 - 12 comments

Canoeing down the Mississippi

Between July 28 and November 10, 2003, Ron Haines canoed down the entire length of the Mississippi. Eight years later, he wrote it up as a series of blog posts with lots of interesting photos and observations: Lake Itasca to Minneapolis-St. Paul. Minneapolis-St. Paul to St. Louis. St. Louis to New Orleans. He also wrote up his logistics and some of the press coverage he got along the way. [more inside]
posted by jiawen on Mar 16, 2013 - 13 comments

Abolished at last

18 years before slavery was finally abolished in Mississippi, T.V. Nation went and got themselves some slaves. [more inside]
posted by Cold Lurkey on Feb 18, 2013 - 87 comments

What a difference a few seasons make.

Less than 20 months after the historic Spring 2011 (previously on MeFi) floods, the Mississippi River may be at similarly historic low levels and flow. Shipping commerce and even drinking water for towns and cities dependent on the Mississippi are under severe threat. [more inside]
posted by paulsc on Jan 11, 2013 - 10 comments

Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work

The author Samuel Langhorne Clemens, a popular MetaFilter topic, was born 177 years ago today (November 30th 1835) in Missouri. The printer, riverboat pilot, game designer, journalist, lecturer, technology investor, gold miner, publisher and patent holder wrote short stories, essays, novels and non-fiction under the pen name Mark Twain. This included The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (recently adapted into a musical), one of the top five challenged books of the 1990s, published in 1884-85 to a mixed reception and with an ending that still causes debate. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Nov 30, 2012 - 42 comments

Squirrel purrs like kitten!1!

Your Saturday dose of interspecies lovin: cat adopts squirrel, squirrel learns to purr (slytb). Warning: seeing this might lead to hours of watching related videos as you fall down a rabbit hole of interspecies fostering.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 17, 2012 - 19 comments

Stephen Fry in America

Stephen Fry in America is a six part BBC television series of one hour shows in which Stephen Fry travels across the United States of America. He travels, mostly in a London cab, through all 50 U.S. states and offers his unique variety of insight as well as his infectious optimism and genuine love for many things American. New World, Deep South, Mississippi [US Edit], Mountains and Plains, True West, and Pacific. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 2, 2012 - 95 comments

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