302 posts tagged with archive.
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Hawaiian treasure preserved in Massachusetts

Interested in historical curiosities from Hawaii, but prefer New England's climate? You're in luck! The American Antiquarian Society, located in Worcester, Mass., is "a hotbed of Hawaiiana," with archives housing and preserving an extensive collection of early Hawaiian engravings, newspapers, "laws, brochures, broadsheets, hymnals, almanacs, cookbooks, primers and spelling books." The Honolulu Civil Beat brings us the story behind the collection. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Dec 8, 2017 - 6 comments

Refugees Are Welcome Here

The Story of Seven-Hundred Polish Children (1966) (18’05, Black & White) [more inside]
posted by Start with Dessert on Dec 3, 2017 - 7 comments

Save Our Stories

Three tools that help digital journalists save their work in case a site shuts down. This is also about preserving articles from writers you care about. If You See Someting You Like, Save It in the Wayback Machine.
posted by storybored on Nov 30, 2017 - 6 comments

A Cornucopia Of The Past

The Royal Botanical Gardens, Burlington, Ontario, has a collection of 30,000 historical seed catalogs. Once produced as ephemera, they are now of interest to historians, biologists, and others. [more inside]
posted by carter on Nov 28, 2017 - 6 comments

1967's most annoying question for women in Catholic ministry

Fifty years ago, Sister Marie Augusta Neal, SND conducted The Sister Survey, a 649-question survey of nearly 140,000 American women in Catholic ministry. It gathered data on sisters' theological beliefs and readiness for social change (and for Vatican II reforms). The dataset's newly available online, and Nicole (@leffel on GitLab) analyzes it to find which question led the most respondents to choose "The statement is so annoying to me that I cannot answer." (The answer: 3702 sisters (3%) chose that response when asked to agree or disagree with: “Christian virginity goes all the way along a road on which marriage stops half way.”)
posted by brainwane on Nov 27, 2017 - 42 comments

The Fingerprint Factory

During World War II the FBI expanded its fingerprint records dramatically. The records were kept on cards in index cabinets in an 80,000 square foot facility in the National Guard Armory in Washington D.C. [more inside]
posted by carter on Nov 8, 2017 - 19 comments

Nintendo®

Nintendo’s old promotional Flash games are being brought back to life. [Origami64] “A modder, programmer, and all-around Nintendo enthusiast who goes by the name Skelux has been working on restoring all of Nintendo’s old promotional Flash games. As these creations only lived online, many of them eventually disappeared without a trace. Over time, Flash became less popular and dedicated Flash-based game websites were often deleted once they had aged past the release they were designed to promote. However, Skelux has made it a mission to restore and make available all of Nintendo’s Flash games, spanning from 1999 to 2010.” [Flash Games Nintendo Made, MEGA Collection!][YouTube] [via: The Verge]
posted by Fizz on Nov 5, 2017 - 2 comments

"I discovered that diaries in families are doomed."

The Great Diary Project: "Diary rescuer" (and also British Museum curator) Irving Finkel, founded the Great Diary Project, a repository for any all diaries in non-digital formats by private individuals. Finkel believes that every diary is a valuable resource full of remarkable details. "All human life is there, and every entry is helpfully dated for future historians." For the sake of posterity, you can donate your own. via ALDaily.
posted by Miko on Nov 3, 2017 - 36 comments

"Books from 1923 to 1941 Now Liberated!"

The Internet Archive today announced that, thanks to "a little known, and perhaps never used, provision of US copyright law," they're now able to offer many books published from 1923 to 1941: the Sonny Bono Memorial Collection. Among the 67 texts currently available, two are famous portrayals of American social life: the U.S.A. trilogy by John Dos Passos (including 1919, selected by Robert McCrum as #58 in The Guardian's 100 Best Novels) and Middletown: A Study in American Culture by Robert and Helen Lynd (a controversial and influential ethnographic study of Muncie, IN, referenced over 100 times in the Indiana Magazine of History). [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Oct 10, 2017 - 17 comments

Keepers of the Secrets

But the real gem of the library, in Lannon’s view, is the stuff that you can find only in boxes like the ones now strewn across the table. “You can get a book anywhere,” he said. “An archive exists in one location.”
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 22, 2017 - 7 comments

26,000 78s digitised

Through the Great 78 Project, the Internet Archive has begun to digitise 78rpm discs for preservation, research, and discovery with the help of George Blood, L.P. Currently the number digitised stands at 25,989. Four stylii are used to transfer the records – 2.0mm truncated conical, 2.3mm truncated conical, 2.8mm truncated conical, 3.3mm truncated conical – recorded flat and then equalised. The preferred version is then chosen by an engineer.
posted by criticalbill on Aug 10, 2017 - 41 comments

The PEN is mightier

PEN America launches the PEN America Digital Archive, capturing more than 50 years of cultural programming at the intersection of literature and freedom of expression advocacy. The free, online archive makes available to the public long-inaccessible records of literary milestones featuring the world’s foremost writers, intellectuals, and artists. Explore the archive by advanced search, the archive index (by subject heading or participant), or view one of the curated features.
posted by Room 641-A on Aug 1, 2017 - 3 comments

The colors of time

On 16 October 1913, two Frenchmen landed in the port of Durrës, or as it was then called, Durazzo, in the recently created Albania. They opened an elongated lacquered trunk, and took out a folding camera mounted on a tripod. They inserted a glass plate, and made photographs of the port, a curious kid in the gate of the former Venetian fortress, two Muslim boys at the base of the wall – one of them also separately –, a man with an attractive face with three or four chickens in his hand, a master who offered his services on the square with a huge-wheeled oxcart and a Ferris wheel pieced together from raw beams. Then they removed the glass plates, and repacked the camera into the trunk. These were the first color photos ever created on today’s Albania. [more inside]
posted by kmt on Jul 24, 2017 - 13 comments

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) Online Reading Room offers streaming access within the United States to nearly 10,000 public television and radio programs from the past 60 years. Read their blog, view their curated exhibits or browse media by topic. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 3, 2017 - 9 comments

Wherefore art thou, Mariotto, Romeus, Rhomeo, Romeo, Etc.?

Three lines from Dante's Purgatorio (early 14th C.). A few motifs from Boccaccio's Decameron, 10th Day, 4th Tale (1353). Masuccio Salernitano's Mariotto and Gianozza (1476; orig. "Ganozza" [PDF]). Luigi da Porto's Giulietta and Romeo (1531; alt. translation). Matteo Bandello's Romeo and Giulietta (1554). Arthur Brooke's Romeus and Juliet (1562; orig. orthography). William Painter's Rhomeo and Iulietta (1567) ... These are just a few antecedents of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (1597, etc.), according to Olin Moore's The Legend of Romeo and Juliet (1950; PDF). [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Apr 23, 2017 - 4 comments

Mal de archivo

At his death in 1988, Luis Barragán, the Pritzker laureate Mexican architect of poetic modernist reknown, left his house and library to an architect friend, and his voluminous professional archive to his business associate. This archive eventually found its way to a New York gallerist, from whom it was bought in 1998 and shipped to Basel by a wealthy Swiss businessman for his fiancé - and has been inaccessible ever since. When conceptual artist Jill Magid (previously) heard of the archive's predicament in 2013, she devised her project The Barragán Archives, whose final chapter might bring about a resoluton: in a pact with the architect's family and the Mexican authorities, by way of a transubstantiation of ashes into a diamond, as a participant in "a gothic love story, with a copyright-and-intellectual-property-rights subplot", she would approach the guarded, private owners of Barragán's legacy with a profound, confounding offer about his body of work - she would make The Proposal. [more inside]
posted by progosk on Mar 26, 2017 - 4 comments

How to make nuts secure

The New York Public Library has digitized 100 "how to do it" cards found in cigarette boxes over 100 years ago. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Mar 25, 2017 - 54 comments

Mind-splitting archive of Lou Reed's life unveiled

Rolling Stone: Today, on what would have been Lou Reed's 75th birthday, Laurie Anderson and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center announced the latter's acquisition of Reed's complete personal archive. It includes 300 linear feet of correspondence, business papers and photographs; more than 600 hours of concert, studio, demo and interview tapes; 1,300 video recordings; and extensive personal memorabilia, including his LP collection. [more inside]
posted by porn in the woods on Mar 2, 2017 - 24 comments

An incalculable pleasure

Calc-Man is a MSDOS-era Pac-Man clone that looks like a spreadsheet, written by Dan Tobias. You can play the DOS version here, or if that's too fancy for you, the older Apple II release.
posted by cortex on Feb 12, 2017 - 12 comments

Insight into how the Victorians visualised the Shakespeare world

Featuring over 3000 illustrations from four Victorian-era editions of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare, the Victorian Illustrated Shakespeare Archive allows you to browse images not only by specific plays or characters, but also by motif (like dogs). "By being able to visualize Shakespeare's plays in this way," says creator Michael John Goodman, "we can appreciate how the plays are like a hall of mirrors — they reflect certain ideas back to each other."
posted by mixedmetaphors on Feb 11, 2017 - 3 comments

An exceptional archive of paintings of children around the world

I Am A Child – Children in Art History, more than 3,100 artists and more than 30,000 paintings. A sampling of various artists' works from horrific depictions of children in war to gently sublime storybook illustrations. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Jan 19, 2017 - 3 comments

Found Sound + Producer = Music

Sponsored by The Netherlands’ Institute for Sound and Vision, the RE:VIVE Initiative brings together archives and artists to create new music out of and inspired by curated sets of archival material. While their workshops are only in The Netherlands, for everyone outside they provide free packs of audio samples collated from different libraries: Pack 1; Pack 2; Schipol Airport; Madagascar, Switzerland, Tahiti, China, and an accordion; Around The House; and The Music of Samoa.
RE:VIVE has collaborated with Fog Mountain Records to release two albums: Damrak, built on samples from Amsterdam; and 010, built on samples from Rotterdam. They have also collaborated with Lakker to provide samples for their Struggle & Emerge album. (A short documentary on the process.)
posted by Going To Maine on Jan 14, 2017 - 2 comments

GifCities!

To celebrate "20 years of preserving the web", the Internet Archive has unveiled GifCities – The Geocities Animated GIF Search Engine. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 26, 2016 - 20 comments

Советские Movies

Free Soviet movies, with English subtitles. Cartoons! Comedy! Sci Fi! Melodrama! Drama Drama! Adventure! Everything!
posted by idiopath on Aug 28, 2016 - 20 comments

Now you're playing with POWER

Archive dot org and Jason Scott have released the complete collection of Nintendo Power magazines, searchable and readable online.
posted by boo_radley on Aug 2, 2016 - 41 comments

Vintage aerial photos of rural America

Vintageaerial.com is a photo archive of over 25 million photos from flyover country (PDF), capturing a time and place that may no longer exist. Some of us rural folk may have grown up with aerial pictures of their farms on the walls. My family had two pictures, one from 1967 and one from 1983. Pretty cool archive if you're interested in that kind of thing. Previously something similar.
posted by cass on Jul 22, 2016 - 10 comments

“Live, and be happy, and make others so.”

[The Bodleian Library] This exhibition is a collaboration between the Bodleian Libraries and the New York Public Library. Few families enjoy such a remarkable reputation for their contribution to the literature and intellectual life of Britain as the Godwins and the Shelleys. Shelley's Ghost: Reshaping the Image of a Literary Family explores how the reputation of this great literary family was shaped by the selective release of documents and manuscripts into the public domain. It also provides a fascinating insight into the real lives of a family that was blessed with genius but marred by tragedy. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 3, 2016 - 4 comments

Wir leben in der Krise

Via the Princeton Blue Mountain project, 336 issues of Der Sturm (german, but with art)
Der Sturm, originally published weekly, covered the visual arts, and also included fiction, poetry, cultural criticism, and political essays. The magazine became well known for the inclusion of woodcuts and linocuts, including works by Marc Chagall,Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Oscar Kokoschka, Franz Marc, László Moholy-Nagy, and others.
(via, english)
posted by frimble on Jun 2, 2016 - 7 comments

“...not more communism but more public-spirited pigs.””

TS Eliot's rejection of Orwell's Animal Farm [The Guardian] Digitised for the first time by the British Library, Eliot’s rejection is now available to read alongside others including Virginia Woolf’s to James Joyce. Eliot’s letter is one of more than 300 items which have been digitised by the British Library, a mixture of drafts, diaries, letters and notebooks by authors ranging from Virginia Woolf to Angela Carter and Ted Hughes. The literary archive reveals that Orwell was not the only major writer to suffer a series of rejections: the British Library has also digitised a host of rejections for James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, showing how his patron Harriet Shaw Weaver attempted to find a printer for the novel she had published in serialised form in The Egoist. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on May 30, 2016 - 19 comments

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What did Americans know as the Holocaust unfolded? How did they respond? A new initiative of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, "History Unfolded" is using crowdsourcing to scour newspapers across the country for articles that ran between 1933 and 1945 on the plight of Europe’s Jews. The project focuses on 20 historical events from the time period. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Apr 16, 2016 - 12 comments

Starlog presents CineMagic: The Guide to Fantastic Filmmaking

If you made (or dreamed about making) super-8mm movies in the late 1970's to early 1980's, and loved visual effects, you read CINEMAGIC magazine. You can download scans of issues here and here (the second link contains a bit more background).
posted by misterbee on Apr 15, 2016 - 4 comments

How to Read a Neighborhood

Dating Historic Images A key to using clues in photos to narrow down the date of construction for historic vernacular architecture, from University of Vermont's Landscape Change digital image project. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Apr 13, 2016 - 11 comments

The seventh book of "hows" : or how to knit

The Knitting Reference Library, approximately 300 knitting books, ranging from the 1800s to the 1970s.
posted by frimble on Apr 8, 2016 - 30 comments

8,000 vintage Afropop songs, streaming online

An amazing treasure trove of 8,000 Afropop tracks. The British Library just released this archive as part of their first online sound project within their Endangered Archives Programme (EAP). The recordings are from the state-supported Syliphone label and were released between 1958 to 1984. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 8, 2016 - 24 comments

Grace's Guide to British Industrial History

‘is a free-content not-for-profit project dedicated to publishing the history of industry in the UK and elsewhere. Its aim is to provide a brief history of the companies, products and people who were instrumental in industry, commencing with the birth of the Industrial Revolution and continuing up to recent times.’ It ‘contains 115,164 pages of information and 163,140 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.’ Browse by Archived Publications, Biographies (‘over 35,000 pages of biographical notes on individuals’), Industries, Locations or Timelines. There is also a blog.
posted by misteraitch on Feb 29, 2016 - 5 comments

What is a dungeon?

WRITE YOUR OWN FANTASY GAME FOR YOUR MICROCOMPUTER (PDF) is a beautifully illustrated guide to programming (what else) fantasy roleplaying games on early personal computer hardware, along with its companion WRITE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE PROGRAMS (also PDF), covering text adventures. Hat tip to the game design Tumblr Put Games Here for the original link. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Feb 9, 2016 - 28 comments

The Revolution Has Been Digitized.

Collections of activist ephemera (posters, leaflets, etc) are increasingly available online. The University of Michigan Library recently made available its digitized Joseph A. Labadie Collection of activist and political posters dating back to 1911. Selected posters from Michael Rossman's 25,000 piece collection "All Of Us Or None" are available online at the Oakland Museum of California. Lincoln Cushing's archive is up at Docs Populi: documents for the public . (via) (previously) [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Aug 4, 2015 - 5 comments

MEEF-EYE

The International Dialects of English Archive (IDEA) is a free, online archive of primary-source dialect and accent recordings of the English language. Founded in 1997 at the University of Kansas, it includes hundreds of recordings of English speakers by natives of nearly 100 different countries. To find an example of an accent or dialect, use the Global Map, or select a continent or region at the Dialects and Accents page. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 27, 2015 - 15 comments

The 8$ Sheep Doll Would Be 200$ Today

With F. A. O. Schwarz's iconic 5th Avenue store closing for good last week (Gothamist photos), why not look back at the 1911 Spring And Summer catalog and the conversation effort to preserve the catalog at the Cooper Hewitt design museum..
posted by The Whelk on Jul 20, 2015 - 15 comments

Vatican Library: more than 500 documents and 1 million pages digitized

In March 2014, the Vatican Library announced it was beginning its efforts to digitize a portion of its extensive collection in coordination with the Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford. In the past year, they've made good progress, as documented on the project's blog, which provide some good insight into the process and the documents that have been digitized to date. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 13, 2015 - 14 comments

DarkAngelØne

George "DarkAngelØne" Redhawk is legally blind, and "likes to play with pictures” to create surreal animated gifs. His full archive contains more than 1000 images. (Some may be NSFW).
posted by zarq on Jul 2, 2015 - 7 comments

Welcome To The World Of Tomorrow

The 1964 NYC World's Fair. Period photos. Then and now. What remains. Video of the Futurama II ride. Stock footage at the Fair. NBC's ' A World's Fair Diary'.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 21, 2015 - 35 comments

"We don't make mistakes, we just have happy accidents."

In the 80's and 90's, Robert Norman "Bob" Ross gave us The Joy of Painting. In each minimalist, 30-minute show, he would create an imaginary landscape using a wet-on-wet (or alla prima) oil painting technique while gently teaching viewers his methods. His signature, soothing comments described the "happy little clouds," "almighty mountains" and "happy little trees" that he was creating with his brush. Of the 31 seasons and 403 episodes that aired on PBS, the Internet Archive currently has the first 19 seasons (247 episodes) available for stream and download. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2015 - 71 comments

Gresham College lectures

Gresham College has provided free public talks within the City of London for over 400 years.’ ‘Since 2001, the college has been recording its lectures and releasing them online in what is now an archive of over 1,000’ of them. Some examples: Snails in Art and the Art of Snails; The History of the Bowler Hat; “Speaking Scars” - The Tattoo; Mother Green Tree Frog and her Children: How Folktales Contributed to the Confucianisation of Korea; The Psychology of Doing Nothing; Möbius and his Band; Harmony in the Lowest Home: The Guitar and the Labouring Poor. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Feb 25, 2015 - 3 comments

Iranian 1979 revolution: Rare footage from French television

A French institute has collected a series of rarely seen videos on the 1979 Iranian revolution, among other things on almost any topic. [more inside]
posted by hoder on Jan 28, 2015 - 18 comments

Browser-emulated MS-DOS games

2,400 MS-DOS games playable in-browser, courtesy of the Internet Archive.
posted by Elementary Penguin on Jan 5, 2015 - 170 comments

Papers, Please?

The dream and the myth of the paperless city [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 2, 2015 - 18 comments

The dogs are green marbles

Writing for Rock, Paper, Shotgun, Alice O'Connor shares her favorite excerpts from her collection of the readme files included in game mods.
posted by gilrain on Nov 14, 2014 - 23 comments

A dose of audio nostalgia for early netizens: much of IUMA, back online

"If you want to hear music, you know what you do - you turn on the radio, put on a CD, or even go to a concert. But as the age of the info superhighway inches forward, you can even get music from your own home computer." That's the intro to a short CNN segment on IUMA, the Internet Underground Music Archive, which opened in 1992 as an effort for unsigned bands to share their music on the world-wide web, for free. Unfortunately, it fell the way of many early 1990s online entities: it was bought out, then the new owners couldn't keep up with changing times, and the site went dark. Except before IUMA disappeared, John Gilmore grabbed much of the material and backed it up on tapes, and turned to (MeFi's Own) Jason Scott and Archive.org to bring back IUMA. They did, and you can now browse through over 45,000 bands and artists, and more than 680,000 tracks of music.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 10, 2014 - 36 comments

Archive.org Gets an Arcade

The fine folks at the Internet Archive bring you The Internet Arcade: some 900+ emulated arcade games from the 1970's through the 1980's. Most of them are playable, many of them through your browser. This is name brand stuff: Pac-Man, Defender, Ghouls 'N Ghosts, and on and on. A fine followup up to last year's Internet Archive Console Living Room (as seen here, naturally.)
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 2, 2014 - 66 comments

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